Clinical & Peer Review Studies

Effects and treatment outcome of Silver Caps during breastfeeding.

STUDY: "EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A SILVER – IMPREGNED MEDICAL CAP FOR TOPICAL TREATMENT OF NIPPLE FISSURE OF BREASTFEEDING MOTHERS"

STUDY DESIGN:

40 breastfeeding moms with painful and/or bleeding fissures and rhagades were split into 2 groups

20 patients were treated with Silver Cap.

20 patients (control group) were treated with breast milk and bandage.

RESULTS:

Pain relief: Silver Cap reduced pain for 70% of the treated moms already after 7 days. Only 20% of the moms in the control group could feel an improvement.

Bleeding: Almost all moms (19/20) who were treated with Silver Cap had no bleedings anymore after 7 days. In the control group, almost 1/4 of the moms had still bleedings.

Fissures: Ca. 70% of the patients had completely healed fissures if they used Silver Cap. In the control group, less than 50% of the patients had healed fissures.

CONCLUSION:

Silver Caprelieves pain faster than traditional treatments and is increasing the healing process in general. Furthermore, the treatment with Silver Cap is not only approved and accepted but also recommended.

 

MORE STUDIES

Schirm E, Schwagermann MP, et al. Drug use during breastfeeding. A survey from the Netherlands. Eur J Clin Nutr 2004; 58: 386 90)

OBJECTIVE:

To survey drug use by breastfeeding women, and to compare this with nonbreastfeeding women. In addition, we were interested in whether drug use was of influence on the decision to give breastfeeding and the other way around.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

During a 6-week period in 2002, a questionnaire was handed out to all women with a child not older than 6 months, who visited a Well-Baby Clinic in the province of Friesland, the Netherlands, eventually resulting in 549 returned questionnaires (response 43%).

RESULTS:

In all, 82.1% of the participants breastfed their baby at least at any time during the first 6 months after birth. More than half (65.9%) of all breastfeeding women had used drugs; however, they used drugs less frequently than nonbreastfeeding women (79.6%). The pattern of drug use differed: oral contraceptives, iron preparations, drugs for peptic ulcer, and several psychotropic drugs were more frequently used by nonbreastfeeding women, while vitamins were more frequently used by breastfeeding women. Drugs play an important role in women’s decision to start or continue breastfeeding: women frequently hesitated to use drugs during breastfeeding, stopped either breastfeeding or drug use to avoid combining the two, took a measure to minimize exposure to the child, did not use any drug because of breastfeeding, or did not breastfeed because of drug use.

CONCLUSIONS:

Drugs are frequently though reluctantly used during breastfeeding, and play an important role in the decision to start and stop breastfeeding. Information on how to deal with drugs seems therefore indispensable in efforts to promote breastfeeding.